Application of anhydrobiosis and dehydration of yeasts for non-conventional biotechnological goals

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Author: Prof., Dr., Alexander Rapoport + 2.

 

World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
June 2016, 32:104
Application of anhydrobiosis and dehydration of yeasts for non-conventional biotechnological goals

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Alexander RapoportEmail authorBenedetta TurchettiPietro Buzzini
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REVIEW
First Online: 27 April 2016
DOI: 10.1007/s11274-016-2058-8
Cite this article as:
Rapoport, A., Turchetti, B. & Buzzini, P. World J Microbiol Biotechnol (2016) 32: 104. doi:10.1007/s11274-016-2058-8
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Abstract
Dehydration of yeast cells causes them to enter a state of anhydrobiosis in which their metabolism is temporarily and reversibly suspended. This unique state among organisms is currently used in the production of active dry yeasts, mainly used in baking and winemaking. In recent decades non-conventional applications of yeast dehydration have been proposed for various modern biotechnologies. This mini-review briefly summarises current information on the application of dry yeasts in traditional and innovative fields. It has been shown that dry yeast preparations can be used for the efficient protection, purification and bioremediation of the environment from heavy metals. The high sorption activity of dehydrated yeasts can be used as an interesting tool in winemaking due to their effects on quality and taste. Dry yeasts are also used in agricultural animal feed. Another interesting application of yeast dehydration is as an additional stage in new methods for the stable immobilisation of microorganisms, especially in cases when biotechnologically important strains have no affinity with the carrier. Such immobilisation methods also provide a new approach for the successful conservation of yeast strains that are very sensitive to dehydration. In addition, the application of dehydration procedures opens up new possibilities for the use of yeast as a model system. Separate sections of this review also discuss possible uses of dry yeasts in biocontrol, bioprotection and biotransformations, in analytical methods as well as in some other areas.

Keywords

Anhydrobiosis in yeast Biosorption agents Biotransformation Dry yeasts Immobilised yeast Test systems Winemaking

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Александр Рапопорт

Заведующий лабораторией. Институт микробиологии и биотехнологии Латвийского Университета

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